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  • New Year Dental Health Resolutions

    Happy New Year! You’ve probably thought about New Year’s resolutions in the wellness category, like eating healthier, going “green”, and increasing exercise. And that’s great! But have you considered your family’s dental health in the New Year? Don’t forget- dental health is an integral part of your overall wellness. Now is a great time to improve your mouth-healthy habits.

    We want to help your family start the New Year off right. Review this checklist with your kids to ensure everyone has a healthier 2017!

    • I’ve visited a dentist within the last six months
    • I’ve followed up with necessary dental work, if needed
    • I brush twice a day, everyday
    • I brush for a full two minutes
    • I brush all areas of my mouth each time
    • I brush my teeth at night and don’t eat again after I brush
    • I floss daily
    • My toothbrush is not older than 4 months
    • My toothbrush is not frayed
    • I keep my toothbrush in a holder at least 4 feet away from the toilet bowl
    • I don’t use my teeth to open packages, tops of containers, etc.
    • I make “happy teeth” food and beverage choices
      • I limit between-meal snacking
      • I rarely consume added sugar – including, but not limited to candy, mints, taffy, cookies, muffins, chips, and soda.
      • I include dairy, lots of fruits and veggies, and water in my diet
      • I eat foods that contain calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C

    Did every member of your family receive a perfect score on the checklist? If so, way to go! If not, there’s room for improvement in 2017. Read our past blog entries and continue to follow our blog for healthy tips and ideas.

    We have two Portland area locations to help you get started, www.visitworldofsmiles.com

    We wish everyone a happy and healthy New Year!

     

    Ten Causes of Bad Breath in Children

    tn_Toothbrush FoofBad breath, medically known as halitosis, is a condition that even healthy children can suffer from. If you’ve noticed that your child’s is not so pleasant, there is hope, and likely an answer. When it comes to bad breath in children, most of the time improper oral hygiene is the culprit.

    What Causes Bad Breath?

    There are many factors that could contribute to bad breath. Here are some of the most common causes in children:

    • Poor oral hygiene. If your child doesn’t brush and floss their teeth regularly, bad breath can result. If plaque is not brushed or flossed away, it can irritate the gums, causing additional issues. The tongue can also hold bacteria that produce foul odors and bad breath, so be sure your child is brushing his tongue as well.
    • Dry mouth. Saliva helps to cleanse and hydrate the mouth. When your child’s mouth is producing less saliva than normal, dry mouth or xerostomia may occur, which can contribute to bad breath.
    • Mouth breathing. When a child breathes through his mouth (due to a stuffy nose, large tonsils, or as a sleep habit), it prevents saliva from washing away bacteria, which promotes dry mouth and again, bad breath.
    • Bacteria on the Tongue. Most odor causing bacteria reside on the tongue. If you don’t brush your tongue as part of your daily oral hygiene routine, odor causing bacteria will accumulate and cause bad breath.
    • Infections in the mouth. Bad breath can also come about as a result of cavities, gum disease, plaque buildup, mouth sores, or oral surgery.
    • A foreign object. Sometimes a baby or toddler will place a foreign object (tiny toys, food particles, etc.) in his or her nose. A foreign object lodged in the nose can cause bad breath in children.
    • Certain foods. If your child consumes foods that have a strong odor, like garlic, onions or specific spices, it can impact the freshness of his breath.
    • Medications. Sometimes, the way medication breaks down in the body can lead to bad breath. This process releases chemicals that may result in bad breath.
    • An illness or condition. If your child is suffering from allergies, a sinus infection, tonsillitis or another condition, bad breath can occur.
    • Vitamin deficiency or dietary imbalance. Eating an imbalanced diet can leave your mouth smelling bad in more than one way. Nutrient-poor meals, especially in Vitamin B12, may lead to halitosis simply by giving your body too few vitamins to work with and can lead to an overall deficiency within the body.

    How to Avoid Bad Breath

    Healthy teeth are integral to a child’s overall health and well-being. You can help your child avoid bad breath by developing an oral care routine.

    • Have your child brush twice a day with a small amount of fluoride toothpaste to promote fresh breath. Always remember to supervise young children so they do not swallow the toothpaste. Use a smear for children unable to spit properly and then a pea-sized mouth for older children.
    • When your child brushes his teeth, make sure he also cleans his tongue, as bacteria can collect and grow on the tongue.
    • Floss daily in order to remove odor causing food particles from the teeth.
    • Remember to get a new toothbrush every few months, because dull bristles cannot effectively remove plaque and debris from the teeth.
    • Avoid halitosis and other oral health concerns by scheduling regular checkups and professional cleanings with a dentist.

    Chronic Bad Breath in Children

    Most of the time, your child’s bad breath will go away once you implement better oral hygiene. However, some children may experience chronic bad breath. If a dentist determines that your child’s mouth is healthy, you may be referred to a primary care physician for additional tests to diagnose the underlying cause of the halitosis.

    Regardless of the cause of bad breath, teaching children how to form good dental care habits at an early age can be vital in terms of their oral health as adults.

    11 Other Uses For Toothpaste

    This article comes from Gizmodo – Dr. Stafford’s Husband is pretty nerdy and reads up on the geek blogs. We can’t say that we have tried any of these suggestions -yet. Still, it is pretty entertaining. Enjoy!

    11 Other Uses for Toothpaste

    BY BRETT MARTIN

    Besides keeping your teeth sparkly, toothpaste offers a wide range of cleaning, cosmetic—even healing abilities around the house. Just be sure to use the white pasty stuff, not gel. And for any of these tips that call for an actual toothbrush, just consider that tool off-limits for the mouth from here on out.

    1. Perfume your palms

    Cutting onions, cleaning fish, or handling garlic can leave a strong odor on your hands. Wash them with toothpaste to remove the smell.

    2. Clean your Jewelry

    Use a soft toothbrush with a tiny amount of toothpaste to brush dull metal jewelry, then rinse and polish it to a shine with a soft cloth. Soak seriously grungy metal in a cup of water with dissolved toothpaste. Don’t use it to get a pearly white finish on actual pearls—toothpaste damages the surface.

    3. Put paste on a damp sponge to wipe crayon off painted walls

    4. Defog goggles

    The mild abrasive in toothpaste is perfect for removing the crud that causes your sporty eyewear to fog up. As a preventative measure, just lightly rub toothpaste inside a diving mask, motorcycle goggles, or on a hockey helmet face guard. Wipe and rinse the surface clean. (Note: YMMV—toothpaste can remove special coatings like anti-glare treatments.)

    5. Clear zits

    Cover pimples with a dab of toothpaste before you hit the sack, then wash your face clean in the morning. This works for bug bites and bee stings too—just remove the stinger first. The paste will dry out and shrink your offending blemishes.

    6. Do your nails

    Toothpaste works on toenails and fingernails like it does on teeth. Clean your nails with a toothbrush and paste to make them strong and shiny.

    7. De-funk a bottle

    Wash baby bottles with toothpaste and a bottle scrubber, making sure to rinse them very well with water. The paste will get rid of that nauseating sour milk smell.

    8. Remove soap scum

    Rub a glass shower door with a damp sponge and a squirt of toothpaste. For heavy scum and soap stains, let the toothpaste sit on the door for several minutes before rinsing it off.

    9. Polish chrome faucet fixtures

     

    10. Hide drink rings

    If you aren’t fanatical about putting coasters under your drinks, then you probably have water rings on your wooden furniture. Rub them off with toothpaste and a soft cloth.

    11. Remove stains

    Scrub a carpet stain with toothpaste on an abrasive brush, then rinse with water. Tough stains require a couple of scrubbings. Toothpaste can also remove stains in cotton clothes, but it doesn’t work for all types of fabric.

    Recent Posts

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      Children and Teeth Grinding

      Grind, grind, grind… …if your little one happens to be a teeth grinder, you may be familiar with this unpleasant sound. Teeth grinding, or what is medically known as bruxism, is common in children. In fact, almost 30% of children grind or clench their teeth, usually in response to stress, jaw growth, malocclusion, losing teeth, […]Read More »
    • A World of Ideas from World of Smiles

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      Here at World of Smiles we understand the importance of our children’s overall health. A healthy smiles comes from a healthy body and mind. In the spirit of promoting a healthy, active, community focused lifestyle we have relaunched our Pinterest page, https://www.pinterest.com/pdxkidsdentist/. Here you will find boards pinned with ideas, inspiration, fun, crafts, and more: […]Read More »
    • New Year Dental Health Resolutions

      New Year Dental Health Resolutions

      Happy New Year! You’ve probably thought about New Year’s resolutions in the wellness category, like eating healthier, going “green”, and increasing exercise. And that’s great! But have you considered your family’s dental health in the New Year? Don’t forget- dental health is an integral part of your overall wellness. Now is a great time to […]Read More »

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