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A World of Ideas from World of Smiles

World of Smiles, PinterstHere at World of Smiles we understand the importance of our children’s overall health. A healthy smiles comes from a healthy body and mind. In the spirit of promoting a healthy, active, community focused lifestyle we have relaunched our Pinterest page, https://www.pinterest.com/pdxkidsdentist/. Here you will find boards pinned with ideas, inspiration, fun, crafts, and more:

 

Hungry for healthy seasonal/holiday snacks, check-out our Food-for-Thought board.

Looking for family fun events around the Portland-Vancouver area, we’ve got you covered, This is happening PDX!

Too soggy to head outside, stay indoors and be creative with our Activities and Crafts board.

We also have fun pediatric dental tips with Healthy Smiles and an inspiring Tooth Fairy board.

The world is an amazing place, go explore its beauty on our World of Wonder board.

We hope you enjoy our Pinterest boards. Happy inspiration, exploring, learning.

 

Need to schedule or reschedule your child’s next dental appointment? We have 2 locations, West (West Portland, Beaverton, Hillsboro, Tigard) and North (East Portland, Vancouver, Milwaukie, Gresham).

 

 

New Year Dental Health Resolutions

Happy New Year! You’ve probably thought about New Year’s resolutions in the wellness category, like eating healthier, going “green”, and increasing exercise. And that’s great! But have you considered your family’s dental health in the New Year? Don’t forget- dental health is an integral part of your overall wellness. Now is a great time to improve your mouth-healthy habits.

We want to help your family start the New Year off right. Review this checklist with your kids to ensure everyone has a healthier 2017!

  • I’ve visited a dentist within the last six months
  • I’ve followed up with necessary dental work, if needed
  • I brush twice a day, everyday
  • I brush for a full two minutes
  • I brush all areas of my mouth each time
  • I brush my teeth at night and don’t eat again after I brush
  • I floss daily
  • My toothbrush is not older than 4 months
  • My toothbrush is not frayed
  • I keep my toothbrush in a holder at least 4 feet away from the toilet bowl
  • I don’t use my teeth to open packages, tops of containers, etc.
  • I make “happy teeth” food and beverage choices
    • I limit between-meal snacking
    • I rarely consume added sugar – including, but not limited to candy, mints, taffy, cookies, muffins, chips, and soda.
    • I include dairy, lots of fruits and veggies, and water in my diet
    • I eat foods that contain calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C

Did every member of your family receive a perfect score on the checklist? If so, way to go! If not, there’s room for improvement in 2017. Read our past blog entries and continue to follow our blog for healthy tips and ideas.

We have two Portland area locations to help you get started, www.visitworldofsmiles.com

We wish everyone a happy and healthy New Year!

 

Many parents don’t realize how early oral care needs to start.

Many parents don’t realize how early oral care needs to start.

By Melinda Wenner Moyer

160726_KIDS_oral-health

If you hear blood-curdling screams coming from my house at 7 a.m. or 7 p.m., don’t fret: I’m just brushing my 2-year-old’s teeth. It’s a traumatic endeavor for us both, and I admit that I’ve sometimes wondered: Is this really worth it? Baby teeth are just, like, temporary teeth, right?

Then I saw some statistics on cavities in young kids and spoke with a couple of pediatric dentists, and was surprised to discover that caring for your wee one’s teeth isn’t optional—it’s essential. So is taking kids to the dentist at a very young age. Don’t worry; you can learn from my mistakes, because I’ve been doing pretty much everything wrong.

Let’s start with the stats: Numbers of cavities among kids have been going down in general, but cavities in baby teeth have become more common over the past 20 years. Today, a whopping 60 percent of 5-year-olds have had at least one cavity; many have had five or even 10. Dental decay in kids isn’t just a nuisance—it can cause a lot of pain, and decayed teeth often have to be repaired or pulled using general anesthesia, which, as I’ve previously reported, isn’t risk-free. And when baby teeth are pulled, they can no longer do the important job of holding space for the budding permanent teeth—some of which don’t come in until age 12—so the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that dentists fit “space maintainers” in their stead when baby teeth are lost early. Cavities in baby teeth can also harm the permanent teeth directly, if the tissue in the central portion of the baby tooth gets infected.

There is good news, though: “Dental decay is preventable,” says AAPD president Jade Miller. When dentists see a cavity forming, they can actually reverse the process—which is in part why the organization recommends that parents bring their children to the dentist when they get their first tooth or by the time they turn 1, at the latest. (If these recommendations don’t mesh with what you’ve heard, that’s probably because the American Academy of Pediatrics used to recommend the first dental visit by age 3. But since 2003, the AAP and the AAPD have both recommended this timeline.)

To understand how dentists work their magic, you first need to know how cavities are formed. Bacteria in the mouth feed on the sugar and carbohydrates your kids eat, releasing acid in response. This acid breaks down tooth enamel and leads to tooth decay, explaining why dentists aren’t fond of kids consuming candy and juice; sugary foods provide feasts for mouth bacteria and lead to a buildup of cavity-causing acid. (Whole fruit, though, is fine: Chewing it stimulates saliva production, which helps to keep teeth clean, and its fibrous texture stimulates the gums.)

One way pediatric dentists can reverse burgeoning cavities is by applying a fluoride varnish to kids’ teeth, which causes fluoride to be released when the pH of the tooth drops as a result of the acid. The fluoride then helps rebuild the tooth enamel. When I finally brought my daughter to a pediatric dentist last week—those statistics on cavities really rattled me!—he didn’t even try to clean her teeth, because (surprise!) she was so uncooperative. But he did apply a quick fluoride varnish. Fluoride from drinking water and toothpaste can also get incorporated into the tooth enamel itself as it grows, thereby protecting it from future decay.

Of course, pediatric dentists do more than just deal with cavities in young toddlers; they can determine whether kids are doing things that might put them at risk for future cavities. For instance, if you’re letting little Jaden take a bottle of milk or juice into the crib with him at night, that’s a red flag for future cavities, and a dentist would likely tell you to stop. (This is so common it has its own name: baby bottle tooth decay.)  The dentist can also check kids for signs of bigger dental or jaw problems. I got a talking-to about my daughter’s pacifier use, which is causing her to develop a gap between her upper and lower teeth. He advised me to nip her pacifier and periodically trim it more, to make it less damaging and appealing and hopefully prompt her to stop reaching for it.

Infant visits also give dentists the chance to educate parents on what to expect during teething and how best to care for kids’ teeth. If I had taken my daughter in when she got her first tooth, I might not be suffering through daily tooth-brushing battles, because I would have been told to wipe her teeth with a washcloth each day as an infant (which I didn’t do) and to start brushing with a toothbrush at age 1 (didn’t do that either). These are habits that establish oral care as a routine early on, making kids more compliant when they hit the terrible twos. Other important advice you might not have heard: brush your kid’s teeth for them at least once a day until they turn 8 or 9—oops, my 5-year-old son has been brushing solo for at least a year!—because the fine motor skills that make for good brushing “don’t really develop until about the age when a child can begin to tie shoes or write in cursive,” Miller explains; and start flossing when your child’s teeth no longer have space between them, because then the toothbrush isn’t able to reach plaque and debris between the teeth. (Yup, cavities can form between teeth, too.)

OK, but what if you, like me, have a kid who just won’t let you near her pearly whites? Jessica Lee, a pediatric dentist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry, suggests experimenting with different types of toothbrushes—maybe little Anna would prefer an electronic toothbrush to a manual one, or vice versa. IPad apps like Brusheez, a brushing timer with characters and music, may also make the task more fun. Or, try letting your kid brush your teeth while you’re brushing hers. If you still can’t get in there for more than a few seconds, Lee suggests that you put a rice grain–size amount of fluoride toothpaste on the brush or your finger and at least just get a little bit of fluoride on her teeth. (Generally, a child shouldn’t use fluoride toothpaste until she knows not to swallow it, but it’s OK, Lee says, to use a tiny amount in this way.)

This article originally appeared on 7/29/16, http://slate.me/2av9Yc9

To schedule an appointment or for more information, please visit, www.visitworldofsmiles.com. We have two Portland area locations to serve you.

Your Child Can Be A Star Flosser

Screen Shot 2016-06-20 at 1.55.57 PMMany dentists are agreeing that flossing is equally as important (arguably more important) than brushing!  Flossing removes plaque, bacteria, and food between the teeth and along the gums  where a toothbrush can’t reach. In fact some sources indicate that brushing alone only reaches 35% of your tooth surfaces.  Unfortunately, it’s also one of the most overlooked practices in caring for our teeth and one of the most common places we find cavities in young children.   You should floss your child’s teeth daily until he or she can do it alone, usually at least until children can tie their own shoes or write in cursive.

Getting children in the habit of daily flossing can yield a lifetime of benefits.

Here are five flossing tips to encourage your child (and you!) to start a regular flossing routine:

  1. Children tend to get better results by using “flossers” or flat, wide dental tape because of the larger spaces between their teeth, however you should choose floss based on what works for you and your child.
  2. Flossing should begin when any two teeth touch.
  3. Flossers are great for parents to access hard-to-reach areas and for children to use to gain dexterity to floss on their own. Once the child is showing more independence and ready to move to the next step, try using around 15-18 inches of floss, gently wrapped around your or your child’s index fingers and held tightly but gently.
  4. Be gentle and avoid snapping floss between teeth because it can damage sensitive gum tissue.
  5. Floss both sides of the tooth, even when another tooth is missing on one side. You want to imagine “rubbing” the floss along each tooth surface. Picture making a little “C” and then a backwards “C”.

Ask us to show you a flossing demonstration at your next visit!!

Ten Causes of Bad Breath in Children

tn_Toothbrush FoofBad breath, medically known as halitosis, is a condition that even healthy children can suffer from. If you’ve noticed that your child’s is not so pleasant, there is hope, and likely an answer. When it comes to bad breath in children, most of the time improper oral hygiene is the culprit.

What Causes Bad Breath?

There are many factors that could contribute to bad breath. Here are some of the most common causes in children:

  • Poor oral hygiene. If your child doesn’t brush and floss their teeth regularly, bad breath can result. If plaque is not brushed or flossed away, it can irritate the gums, causing additional issues. The tongue can also hold bacteria that produce foul odors and bad breath, so be sure your child is brushing his tongue as well.
  • Dry mouth. Saliva helps to cleanse and hydrate the mouth. When your child’s mouth is producing less saliva than normal, dry mouth or xerostomia may occur, which can contribute to bad breath.
  • Mouth breathing. When a child breathes through his mouth (due to a stuffy nose, large tonsils, or as a sleep habit), it prevents saliva from washing away bacteria, which promotes dry mouth and again, bad breath.
  • Bacteria on the Tongue. Most odor causing bacteria reside on the tongue. If you don’t brush your tongue as part of your daily oral hygiene routine, odor causing bacteria will accumulate and cause bad breath.
  • Infections in the mouth. Bad breath can also come about as a result of cavities, gum disease, plaque buildup, mouth sores, or oral surgery.
  • A foreign object. Sometimes a baby or toddler will place a foreign object (tiny toys, food particles, etc.) in his or her nose. A foreign object lodged in the nose can cause bad breath in children.
  • Certain foods. If your child consumes foods that have a strong odor, like garlic, onions or specific spices, it can impact the freshness of his breath.
  • Medications. Sometimes, the way medication breaks down in the body can lead to bad breath. This process releases chemicals that may result in bad breath.
  • An illness or condition. If your child is suffering from allergies, a sinus infection, tonsillitis or another condition, bad breath can occur.
  • Vitamin deficiency or dietary imbalance. Eating an imbalanced diet can leave your mouth smelling bad in more than one way. Nutrient-poor meals, especially in Vitamin B12, may lead to halitosis simply by giving your body too few vitamins to work with and can lead to an overall deficiency within the body.

How to Avoid Bad Breath

Healthy teeth are integral to a child’s overall health and well-being. You can help your child avoid bad breath by developing an oral care routine.

  • Have your child brush twice a day with a small amount of fluoride toothpaste to promote fresh breath. Always remember to supervise young children so they do not swallow the toothpaste. Use a smear for children unable to spit properly and then a pea-sized mouth for older children.
  • When your child brushes his teeth, make sure he also cleans his tongue, as bacteria can collect and grow on the tongue.
  • Floss daily in order to remove odor causing food particles from the teeth.
  • Remember to get a new toothbrush every few months, because dull bristles cannot effectively remove plaque and debris from the teeth.
  • Avoid halitosis and other oral health concerns by scheduling regular checkups and professional cleanings with a dentist.

Chronic Bad Breath in Children

Most of the time, your child’s bad breath will go away once you implement better oral hygiene. However, some children may experience chronic bad breath. If a dentist determines that your child’s mouth is healthy, you may be referred to a primary care physician for additional tests to diagnose the underlying cause of the halitosis.

Regardless of the cause of bad breath, teaching children how to form good dental care habits at an early age can be vital in terms of their oral health as adults.

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